Are UFO videos increasing or decreasing???

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“Ghosts, Nessie, Bigfoot, “little silver men with menacing probes”: there was a time we used to hear a lot about these various manifestations of the
strange, spooky and suspect. But not any more. In the past few years there has been a spectacular market crash in many kinds of paranormal activity;
somehow our world just isn’t as weird as it was.
Take the Loch Ness Monster. Since the first modern sighting in 1933, Nessie-watchers have been able to rely on about 15-20 reported sightings a year,
with occasional paranormal peaks of up to 40. This January the official Loch Ness Monster fan club admitted that in the preceding 18 months they had
heard of a meagre three spottings. “There has been an unusually low number of sightings, all of which were made by local people,” admits Gary
Campbell, club president. “It appears that no tourists at all have seen anything unusual.”

Then there’s the slump in hauntings. Tony Cornell is a vice-president of the Society for Psychical Research, the UK’s most prestigious ghost-busting
association. Cornell has been investigating ghosts for 50 years but hasn’t been using his £8,000 of poltergeist-detecting equipment of late. “The
society used to get maybe 60 to 80 reports of ghosts in a year,” he says. “Now we get none. None at all. A remarkable decline. It is still very
strange.”

But the starkest evidence for this general dwindling of weirdness probably comes with UFOs. Earlier this year, the UK’s favourite flying saucer
fanzine, UFO Magazine, folded due to declining sales. At the same time, Bufora, the top UK forum for skywatchers, ruefully admitted that UFO sightings
have been in “steady decline” since the late 1990s. Most striking of all, the British Flying Saucer Bureau has suspended its activities, because the
number of sightings has crashed from a peak of around 30 a week to almost zero. Denis Plunkett, the retired civil servant from Bristol who founded the
bureau in 1953, says: “I am just as enthusiastic about flying saucers as I always was, but the problem is that we are in the middle of a long, long
trough. There just aren’t enough new sightings. It is not like being a philatelist. There is always something new to say about stamps.”

This isn’t just a British phenomenon. In Indiana in the US an amateur association of scientific ufologists known as Madar (multiple autonomy detection
and automatic recording) has seen a steady and accelerating fall-off in UFO activity since the peaks of the mid-70s. Likewise, New Jersey’s
skywatchers have openly wondered whether to call it a day. Even the cold skies of northern Norway are bereft: “It’s unexplainable,” says Leif-Norman
Solhaug, leader of Scandinavian skywatching society UFO Nord-Norge. “Maybe people are just fed up with the UFO hysteria.””

Looks like that is the case..

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